U.S. Supreme Court Allows TN Police to Keep Collecting DNA Samples Without Warrant

Recently, the U.S. Supreme Court has upheld the right of police to take DNA samples of violent offender suspects without first obtaining a warrant. To obtain DNA, police do not have to take a blood sample, but usually collect it by rubbing a cotton swab on the inside of a person's cheek. The DNA samples are kept in a database so that investigators can link them to active cases.

According to a spokesperson for the Tennessee Bureau of Investigation, only one technician handles all the testing for the entire state. Out of the 80,000 samples that have been submitted, 60,000 have linked persons to a crime, ending in a conviction. Tennessee's database is connected to the Federal Bureau of Investigation so that they may also use the samples for comparison purposes.

Some claim that this DNA database does not just aid prosecutors, but defense attorneys as well, because it is simply an "evidence tool". While DNA testing has been looked upon with some suspicion in past years, it is now becoming more accepted as a reliable source of evidence.

If you are being charged with a criminal offense, then do not hesitate to obtain legal representation from a Franklin, TN criminal defense lawyer at Franklin Law Offices, PLC. Our firm can provide you with tough legal defense throughout the entirety of your case. We want to make sure that all evidence was properly acquired and handled. If not, then it may be grounds for dismissal.

We have successfully assisted more than 200 clients, so trust that we can assist you as well. Even if you do not initially get the outcome that you desired, we can take your case to appeals! Call our office to begin working with our legal team. We serve clients in both Spanish and English!

Internet Marketing Experts The information on this website is for general information purposes only. Nothing on this site should be taken as legal advice for any individual case or situation. This information is not intended to create, and receipt or viewing does not constitute, an attorney-client relationship.