7 Things You Need to Know About Speeding 100 MPH or Over Can Land You in Jail in Franklin, Williamson County, Tennessee

Driving 100 MPH or above in Williamson County, Tennessee can land you in jail.

Whether it’s on I-65, I-840 or any other road in Williamson County, speeding at a high rate is dangerous and can get you in trouble.

The 21st Judicial District Attorney’s Office and the Court’s speeding policy is strict because speeding 100 MPH or above could lead to you or someone else being injured or killed.

General Sessions Judge Denise Andre sends the message loud and clear when sentencing drivers for driving at excessive speeds: “Speed Kills, I’m glad you are safe and so are the others on the road.”

Even though this is the policy in Williamson County, you won’t find a shortage of drivers that are speeding.

I love going fast. I should’ve been a race car driver or pilot. I am also aware of the danger and I have decided to not speed. I highly recommend you take the safer route also and not exceed the speed limit. Planning to leave a little earlier drastically eliminates the the need to go faster in order to arrive at your destination on time.

Here are 7 things you need to know if you’re already cited for speeding 100 MPH or above in Williamson County, Tennessee or don’t take the safe route and are issued a citation.

1) First Court Date.

When you are cited in Williamson County, TN you are given a First Appearance Court Date. Some courts call this arraignment.

What you need to know is that you will wait an hour or more for docket call and be given a piece of paper with your return court date, often called your Trial Date.

You can apply for an appointed attorney, attend your Trial Date with an attorney you hire, or represent yourself.

2) Hire an Attorney.

I always recommend you hire the best attorney you can afford. If that is an appointed attorney then take that.

Fees vary from attorney to attorney. If you mention this article, I will provide a $150 discount off my normal fee for speeding 100 MPH or over.

Call (615) Nash-Law and mention this article.

3) We Have 2 Goals.

In each case we fight to accomplish two goals for you. You have to know where you are and where you want to go to be successful at anything.

Your case in court is no different. You are facing jail and having this go on your criminal record.

The first goal is to limit jail. The second is limit the damage to your record. There are a number of ways we accomplish these goals.

4) The 5 Options in Court.

You have 5 basic options in General Sessions Court in Williamson County, Tennessee.

i) Negotiate a Plea Agreement. For speeding 100 MPH or above the state usually offers either 24-48 hours in jail or use diversion and have 30 days probation.

ii) Preliminary Hearing and it’s Bound Over to Circuit Court. If you don’t want to accept the best offer you or your attorney negotiate you have a right to preliminary hearing. This is not a trial rather a hearing for the Judge to determine if law enforcement had probable cause to cite you.

Probable cause is more likely than not a crime was committed and you committed it. It’s a low standard. The next highest standard is the civil standard: preponderance of the evidence. Then the higher standard of beyond a reasonable doubt for criminal trials.

Once your hearing is concluded and the Judge finds probable cause it is sent to the grand jury (group of citizens that review the evidence presented by the District Attorney’s Office and determine if there’s probable cause).

If they find there’s probable cause they issue a True Bill and indict you in Circuit Court.

iii) Waive the Preliminary Hearing and Bind Over to Circuit Court. Same as ii except no hearing.

iv) Bench Trial. You can have a trial in front of the General Sessions Judge who will determine if you’re guilty or not guilty and then sentence you.

v) Continue. Sometimes the District Attorney requests a continuance and sometimes we request one for one reason or another. Each case differs as does the ability to continue.

5) Diversion.

TCA (Tennessee Code Annotated) Section 40-35-313 allows you, if eligible, to plea a conditional plea of guilty and if you comply with all the terms and conditions of court and probation, the case will be dismissed and you can expunge it.

This is a once in a lifetime chance and to be eligible you can’t have a Class A Misdemeanor or higher and served jail. If you think you’re eligible, visit TBI Diversions to apply and pay the $100 application fee.

6) Probation.

If you avoid jail on speeding 100 MPH or over they will probably want 30 days probation. The probation office will go over all the rules and conditions after you enter your plea.

It is important to comply with the conditions such as report timely, report any new arrests/citations, be able to pass drug screens etc.

Failure to comply could lead to a violation of probation and having to serve your full sentence.

7) Expungement.

If your case is dismissed, nolled, or you plead under diversion you may apply to expunge your record after your case is over.

You can hire an attorney or go to the clerk of court and apply there. There is a filing fee if it wasn’t dismissed or nolled. If it was dismissed or nolled then there isn’t a filing fee.

This will wipe it off your record like it never happened.

This is an overview of what happens if you are cited for driving 100 MPH or above in Williamson County, Tennessee. All cases vary depending on the specific facts involved. It is important to contact a licensed Criminal Defense Attorney in Franklin, Williamson County, Tennessee to see how your facts will affect the outcome of your case.

Call now Attorney Brian Lee Nash at Nash Law PLLC (615) 627-4529 (615 Nash Law) for a free consultation. We look forward to meeting you and helping you through this stressful situation.

The information on this website is for general information purposes only. Nothing on this site should be taken as legal advice for any individual case or situation. This information is not intended to create, and receipt or viewing does not constitute, an attorney-client relationship.