What Happens If You Are Stopped for a DUI In Tennessee (Video)

So you've been stopped by law enforcement for suspicion of DUI in Tennessee.

This is a scary moment for sure. Especially if you've had some alcohol. The law says you can't be impaired and in control of a vehicle. Of course the best thing is to always get a ride, Uber or Lyft. If you didn't here's what you need to know.
Give your name, license and registration. Don't say anything else. These Pot Brother attorneys say it best, Shut the F*ck up Friday when discussing marijuana laws. The same applies here, shut the f*uck up everyday. You don't have to answer their questions.
You also don't have to submit to field sobriety tests, breathalyzer or blood work. The State of Tennessee can still convict you without these things but it is more difficult.
Law enforcement still may be able to obtain a warrant to draw your blood and you can't stop them if they do. Fight it later.
If you are taken into custody bond out and hire the best attorney you can afford.
I waive my client's first appearance to court and we are given a trial date where we go to court, law enforcement should be there, the District Attorney's Office and the judge.
There are five main options in General Sessions Court in Tennessee.
Negotiate a plea agreement. Try to get your DUI reduced, dismissed or plea.
Preliminary Hearing and bind over to circuit court.
Waive your right to preliminary hearing and bind over to circuit court.
Bench trial.
Continue for some reason.
The DUI minimums in Tennessee are 48 hours in jail, a fine, court costs, probation, loss of license and alcohol safety school. You may be eligible for a restricted license.
Let our experienced trial attorneys at Nash Law PLLC help you and answer any questions you may still have. Call us at (615) Nash-Law (6274-529).

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