7 Steps to Help Us Help You Win Your Criminal Case

7 Steps to Help Us Help You Win Your Criminal Case

By Attorney, Brian Lee Nash

Among the most stressful things you or a loved one can experience is being arrested and facing jail time. Often the arrest results from something done. Other times the arrest may have been the result of being in the wrong place at the wrong time. Either way, you have to defend yourself, and the wise will enlist the help of a criminal attorney.

(615) Nash-Law is here to help you. We are criminal lawyers with expertise that has helped thousands with legal charges. You may not have been charged yet, but are under investigation (pre-charge). You may be facing driving charges, includingspeeding over 100 mph, DUI, simple possession, paraphernalia, violations of probation (VOP), domestic or simple assault, major drug charges, soliciting prostitution or prostitution. At (615) Nash-Law, we not only help our clients with legal issues, but also the “big picture” (moving forward successfully).

(615) Nash-Law will work to help you be in a better position after your case is over. In order to do so we will guide you in ways that help us help you. Understand that our recommendations are not outcome determinative. This means that, by following our recommendations your case will not automatically be dismissed or reduced. Rather, it means that these recommendations will improve your life and help your case. Our recommendations may even result in your case being dismissed or reduced. One thing is certain: if you neglect to do anything, your odds will not improve.

At (615) Nash-Law you are the hero and we are your coach. We will guide you to do what heroes do. Think of yourself as the star hero in your favorite superhero movie. When you are down, or hit rock bottom, we come along to ignite your super hero instincts. Suddenly you are overcoming what you thought to be insurmountable obstacles with a winner mindset. With our help you will grow, learn new skills, and persist.

7 Steps to help us help you win your criminal case. Following these steps you will come out better than when you started. Here are the 7 steps:

  1. Mental Health and Emotions.

Strive to work through your feelings and emotions on your own. It’s important to have a clear mind when dealing with legal situations. We are here to help you deal with the emotions, though we recognize that cannot take the place of trained professionals.

Use this opportunity to learn and grow from your experience. We find that many, if not most, of our clients suffer from mental and emotional challenges. A counselor or psychiatrist can be a great help to you.

We highly recommend the book, “Smart but Stuck”, by Thomas E. Brown. This book is an easy and affordable start to moving forward. The author focuses on ADHD (attention deficit, hyperactivity disorder), but might lead to other personal discoveries.

  1. Drug and Alcohol Assessment and Abstinence.

We highly recommend that you not use any alcohol, or other drugs for which you don’t have a valid prescription. This is not court required, but is a good choice as you move through this time in your life (helpful toward step 1 above). These two combined steps will not only help you fight your criminal charges, but will change your overall quality of life for the better.

We recommend continuing these two steps after your court case is settled. If you are in Franklin, Tennessee, you can take your Alcohol and Drug Assessment at Educare Counseling Center. Their phone is (615) 905-5182, and their address is 382 Natchez St, Franklin, TN 37064.

  1. No New Charges.

Perhaps the best thing you can do is what you don’t do: Don't get a new criminal charge while you are fighting your current charges. You may or may not be surprised at how many people get multiple charges at one time. This complicates your case no matter if charges are in the same city/county or a different state altogether.

All District Attorney's look unfavorably on a record like this, as it clearly appears that if they have leniency in making you an offer, with little or no jail time, you show a pattern of committing more crimes in the future that may hurt you or others.

Bottom line: Stay clean and play it safe. Do not associate with anyone that could get you in trouble, and always demonstrate extra caution while you have a case pending and/or probation afterwards.

Many who follow this advice, thank us later. My personal advice is for you to seek professional help as described in steps one and two, and look for ways to fill any of your down time with a hobby or second job. Staying active physically and mentally will help keep you out of trouble. Step 4 can also help with this.

  1. Volunteer.

You may not have time for this, but if you do, serving others is helpful way to feel good about yourself. We understand your work, loved ones and striving to get your mental health and/or alcohol and drug issues under control, you may have all you can do without volunteering, but the point is to stay active and productive.

You will find, when living in the present, and riding self of an ego centered, stifled life, that serving others truly brings joy and makes life worth living. Staying consumed our own feelings can keep us stuck and so inward focused that we lose site of the needs of others. Volunteering looks so good and makes us feel good. Do so is especially meaningful to your situation and speaks volumes to the Assistant District Attorney, as they consider your case. DA's see volunteering as a positive reflection on mental and emotional stability. They also consider that taking on responsibilities suggests you are less likely to be living into active addiction to alcohol or other drugs, as addiction rarely puts others first.

Volunteering is good for you, and looks good for you in court. Keep in mind that none of these steps are outcome determinative, yet they are good for you and demonstrative of what heroes do. Be a hero!

  1. Employment.

It is unquestionably wise and helpful to get a job if you don’t have one, and stay employed once you do have a job. Having a job serves many purposes, while helping you support yourself. A job gives you confidence, while uplifting your mood and emotions. Being gainfully employed can also keep you out of trouble by keeping you busy, occupying your headspace, and giving you the ability to pay for things you need.

The District Attorney's office definitely wants to see that you are being a productive member of society, and being gainfully employed is a big part of that. So, have a job, or two, or three. If you need money, as we all do, then you must prove that you are willing to do what is necessary to earn the money. If you don’t need to work two or three jobs, or you are unable to do so, then make sure to find a hobby and volunteer your services.

  1. Learn and Grow.

In her book, Mindset, Carol S. Dweck, Ph. D., teaches that it is better to have a growth mindset as opposed to a fixed mindset. Be more open in your thinking, rather than closed. Be curious, learn from your mistakes, and don’t get stuck. It's easier said than done, but it is possible to live this way. This book is highly recommended for you during this time.

Go to the library, if you don’t have funds to buy books, and read a book already suggested, or one of the following from my reading list. These books are those that have helped me and they are sure to help you learn and grow too.

  • The Art of Learning, by Josh Waitzkin

  • Perfect Love, Imperfect Relationships by John Welwood

  • Be Here Now, by Echart Tolle

  • The Way of the Superior Man, by David Deida

  • Smart but Stuck, (*best ADHD book) by Thomas E. Brown, PhD

  • Hold onto Your Kids, by Gabor Maté (Great book that teaches how to have a great relationship with your children which also can be used for any relationship. Our children are humans also.)

  • Choose Yourself, by James Altucher (one of my favorite authors of all time)

If money is an object, or you only enjoy audio books, get one of the books above on Audible.com. For podcast recommendations, start learning and growing from these. They are the ones I listen to regularly, or have listened to:

  1. Balance.

Realize life is all about balance.

There are 5 main pillars we teach in my business:Ink and Iron Fitness. They are:

  1. Nutrition;

  2. Fitness;

  3. Mental/Spiritual;

  4. Finance; and

  5. Relationships.

If you are in trouble, it is most likely because you are out of balance in one or more of these 5 pillar areas. Analyze your situation and how you feel with these questions: Are you tired? Craving food, sex, alcohol or drugs? How are your relationships? Are you lonely?

Many people suffer from imbalance. We are consumed with way too much mindless work, and not prioritizing what is most important. Make a list of how you feel, what you spend your time doing and how much time you waste. Cut out a few things such as excessive TV and social media. You do not have to quit, just cut back. Use your new found time to think, feel, breath and sit quietly with yourself.

Learn to be okay with your emotions and perhaps seek help working through them. Study, read and decide what to prioritize while going through difficult times with your criminal case.

Now is the time to correct the course of your life. Only you can decide to do this while recognizing that others can help you with it. We are here for you to encourage course corrections that will help you in overcoming your criminal legal challenges. Call (615) Nash-Law.

8. Bonus: Here are the questions that I have learned to ask myself throughout the day. They can be especially helpful when overwhelmed or stressed:

  1. What problems do I have right now, in this moment?

    1. Are you getting robbed?

    2. Are you having trouble breathing?

    3. Is everything fairly calm as you read this article?

    4. Identify what you are feeling.

  2. You most likely have no immediate “problem”, right?

  3. Now that you are present, think about what challenges you have that require you to take some kind of action in order to overcome:

    1. Name them....

    2. Identify how the challenges make you feel?

      1. Stressed

      2. Overwhelmed

      3. Fearful

      4. Etc

  4. List action steps to overcome these problems. For example:

    1. Identify the problem and how you feel.

      1. I have been arrested and I need to overcome this.

        1. I am scared I will go to jail.

        2. I am scared of what will happen if I go to jail.

        3. I am worried my record will be damaged and I will lose, or not be able to get a job.

        4. I am concerned I won’t have the money to pay for the attorney and everything else.

        5. I am embarrassed to tell my parents, children, and significant others etc.

        6. I am scared because I have never been in this situation before.

  1. Now list the steps to overcome this challenge, thereby addressing your feelings and relieving them.

    1. “I will hire Nash Law PLLC.”

    2. “I will call or text them at (615) Nash-Law, knowing they have great reviews, will explain the process, my options, how much criminal lawyer fees are for my case, and how they can help me find balance.”

    3. “I will have a phone consult with them, sign up online with them, or go to their office for their next available appointment.”

    4. “I will look for and schedule an appointment for a counselor or psychiatrist as needed.”

    5. “I will inventory my time and will cut back social media in ways that will allow me to sit, process my feelings, breath and be calm.”

    6. “I will go on hikes two or more times a week.”

    7. “I will get a second job if needed to provide the extra money needed to pay Nash Law PLLC, court costs and possible probation, should that be assigned.”

  2. Do all of these steps in phone notes, Bear Note App, or with paper and pen. Carry these thoughts with you everywhere and review them often during the day.

Only look back to see how you got to where you are, but always remember that we have to live life looking forward. Stay focused and positive, and let us help you move forward.

Call or text us now: (615) Nash-Law.


The information on this website is for general information purposes only. Nothing on this site should be taken as legal advice for any individual case or situation. This information is not intended to create, and receipt or viewing does not constitute, an attorney-client relationship.